Prima Blog | Women's Hunting, Fishing & Outdoor Adventure Tips

Prima Blog

Stay connected with our latest articles on our Blog! These ladies are passionate about sharing their adventures, stories, and tips! Be sure to comment and let them know what you think. 

Live Outdoors

Live Outdoors

By: Amy Felhaber A Little Bit About Myself I grew up in the country, just outside the small town of Eganville, Ontario, Canada. I was fortunate enough to be raised on a farm with lots of land to roam and was able to experience and enjoy the outdoors from a young age. I was raised in a family where my father and brothers religiously attended the hunt camp each fall and it was only natural for me to begin hunting around the age of 15. I became more avid about five  years ago when I met my boyfriend Bill, when I was introduced to turkey and waterfowl hunting on top of my traditional passion for hunting whitetails as well as small game. Fishing has also been a big part of our family, as we grew up with access to the water and private fishing lakes on our property. At a young age, my father would bring us fishing at the lake behind Grandma’s house and we would always bring home a northern pike or two and have some fresh fish for supper. Fishing is always the sport between seasons; summer fishing before fall hunting season started and winter ice-fishing when the fall hunts were over. It’s something I always look forward to during the year. I could not imagine myself today without being so involved in the outdoors. Within the past couple of years, there have been many successes, as well as many less fruitful hunting adventures. However, I always enjoy my time spent outdoors, and therefore the result of an outing doesn’t dictate my hunting or fishing experience... read more
Saltwater Escape

Saltwater Escape

By: Tricia Ricks The warm, salty breeze flowed through the window, rushing over our bed and gently waking us from our sleep. The tide laps rhythmically against the beach. This is paradise. We are only one day into our vacation and I have already lost track of the date and time. Oh well, it’s Island Time for the next six days. Bringing my coffee out to the front porch of our beachside bungalow, I take in the amazing view. Dawn is breaking over the Caribbean, and it’s as if all my favorite colors in the crayon box have melted into a postcard-worthy cliché. I scan my eyes across the flats, looking for the telltale signs of feeding fish. With no tails in sight, I gather my things and prepare for the day. Swimsuit – check. Rod and flies – check and check. Kalik in the soft cooler – double-checked! My, oh my, do I love saltwater fly-fishing! We walk the endless sand and coral flats along the edge of the mangroves looking for signs of Albula vulpes, more commonly known as bonefish. Sunlight sparkles off the ripples of the incoming tide, making it difficult to spot the well-camouflaged iridescence of our quarry. I remember to look for shadows along the sandy bottom, giving clues to their location; movement catches my eye. A shadow drifts in and out of a pool at the edge of the mangroves, betraying the location of a feeding bonefish. I cast my fly several feet in front of the dusky apparition in hopes of intercepting its path. The fly settles and I give it a... read more
A Family Affair

A Family Affair

By: Taylor Reisbeck I grew up roaming the mountains of Montana with my parents Kasey and Tabatha, and my brothers Tucker and Walker. From being packed on my parent’s backs to holding hands down the trails surrounded by tall pine trees and into open meadows, my parents were a big inspiration as to why I love hunting and being in the outdoors. Honestly, all I can think about is my next outing into the beautiful Montana mountains. We as a family were always hunting, fishing and driving on the old rocky roads in the Big Sky Country. I can’t remember driving into the mountains unless it was to hike, fish, shoot gophers or to even try to get my brothers to sleep when they were young. My parents tell me that they would ask me, “What does an elk say?” and I would respond with an elk bugle, which was my first animal sound. My dad would bugle all the time, whether it was from his bedroom, garage or yard (getting some of the neighbors to bugle or cow call back at us). Meanwhile I would grab my mom’s vacuum hose from inside the house and try to copy my dad. You know, practice makes perfect. My brothers have learned the skill of elk calling and have become great callers too.  Tucker signed up for a bugling competition in Lincoln, Montana when he was about 11 years old, competing with other kids and adults.  He was sort of a shy person, so to our surprise he actually did it.  Tucker took second place and boy oh boy my dad... read more
Houndswoman

Houndswoman

By: Shayla Pukas Hunting is a way of life for many of people in the world. I wasn’t always a hunter, but the day I pulled the trigger on my first whitetail buck, I knew it was in my blood. At the age of 14, I was introduced into the hunting world by one of my friends and ever since I have been hooked. After a few years of hunting big game like whitetail deer, elk and mule deer, I was introduced to a whole different type of hunting, hound hunting. I rescued my first hound dog from the local Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA); he was a 4-month-old bluetick coonhound. I wasn’t very familiar with hound hunting, but that soon changed after I began hunting with a few local houndsmen. After seeing my first majestic cougar, sitting perched high in a pine tree, and hearing the amazing hound song, I knew this was the life I wanted to live. Gunner, my bluetick, soon learned how to track and tree cougars himself and I realized I needed to get him a hunting partner. I now have a plott hound, Jane, an english hound, Storm and my trusty bluetick Gunner. Being a houndswoman is more than just having a dog, it takes guts, trust, stamina, patience, heart and a whole lot of outdoor knowledge. You need to know how to read a GPS; figure out how old a track is; do what we call “homework” once you find a track; and really study what the cougar, bobcat or lynx is doing and where they are heading.... read more
The Devil Wears Sitka

The Devil Wears Sitka

By: Glenda Groat Many girls identify with the popular movie “The Devil Wears Prada,” which tells the story of a small town girl who lands her dream job working for a socialite magazine editor in New York City. The ill-prepared girl quickly finds out she’s in over her head and her boss is the devil disguised in Prada. My story is a little different, that office is a mountaintop in the Northwest Territories or a tree stand in Saskatchewan, and my fashion doubles as practical gear. But I was that naive girl starting out that felt like I was in over my head a little at times. I was ill-prepared to say the least and some days what started as a fun hunting trip turned into more a survival mission. As a guide in this industry, you are out with Mother Nature, whatever she may bring, which we all know isn’t always friendly. When I was starting out I didn’t want to spend a fortune on brand name gear and the latest and greatest stuff, instead I chose to make do with what I had. I hunted sheep in cowboy boots and pearl snap shirts and I had the original Helly Hansen rubberized rain gear, you know, the good stuff.  Though these pieces of clothing may all be awesome in their own regard, I was not feeling their awesomeness on a seven-hour trail ride in the freezing rain, or when that mid-August snowstorm hit in the Yukon. Plus, my optics, well that’s another story; I sported my father’s 30-year-old Bausch & Lomb spotting scope from when he was guiding... read more
Aim to Connect

Aim to Connect

By: Jackie Bartz I’ve made a career of telling stories but they are always other people’s stories. As a journalist I’ve shared thousands of people’s stories but my name is always in the byline, never in the text. A good storyteller connects the audience with the character and in this story I am both. I’m a writer and a hunter, and I always aim to connect. I vividly remember the first time I connected in the field. I was 15-years-old and had completed my hunter safety course that year (I was the only teenage girl in a room of adolescent boys). One afternoon my dad picked me up from school and we headed out to hunt. Just before dusk, we spotted a pair of mule deer. Slowly and as quietly as I muster in my jeans, we put my first stalk on an animal. We snuck into range and my dad laid on the cold ground for me to rest my gun across his back. Seconds led to minutes, quite a few minutes in fact, my poor dad about suffocated trying to hold his breath before I took a shot, but I connected. That connection changed my life; it’s what fuels my passion today. The excitement of harvesting my first animal is a feeling I will never forget but what I remember most is the smile on my dad’s face, the hug and the lifelong connection it forged between a father and his camo-clad daughter. Throughout high school and college, I chased elk, deer and antelope with my dad. I never took any trophies but every single one was... read more
Genesis

Genesis

By: Tricia Ricks The buck stood quartering-to, distracted by his current love interest but fixated on my location ever since I had belly-crawled over the ridge. He was a handsome deer, with wide, evenly matched antlers that stood starkly against the snowy backdrop. Taking into account the wind and range, I slowly crushed the trigger and forever tied our two lives together. Standing in the echo of the shot, I reflected on the journey that led to this moment. I grew up with two older brothers in the boreal forest of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  Although the area is steeped in a rich hunting heritage, my family didn’t hunt. We barely fished. In fact, to this day one of my brothers still won’t touch a fish. Instead, like many families, mine bonded over competitive sports and I became a driven and focused young lady. I met my future husband in 2002 and he quickly introduced me to fly-fishing. I loved learning about the many facets of the sport: reading the water, the varied casting techniques, entomology and fly selection. It all seemed so tantalizing and quickly became a passion. The quiet anticipation of a strike is so exciting; the steady pull of the current, so relaxing. In 2006, we decided to move to Montana, to live our dream and one day raise a family in a wealth of outdoor recreational opportunities. At the time, I still did not hunt. I’d tag along on backcountry elk hunts or assist in training our new puppy to become a hunting retriever but I still felt like an observer, not a participant. One late... read more
It’s All About the Thrill, Not the Kill

It’s All About the Thrill, Not the Kill

By: Shayla Pukas Some people say hunting with hounds is unfair or cruel but the thing about hound hunting is that it is a totally ethical way to maintain predator populations easily. Hound hunters see firsthand the populations of bobcats, lynx, cougars, bears and even wolves and coyotes. We as houndsmen and houndswomen are also conservationists. We live to maintain a healthy predator population for our ungulate populations to thrive. When I go out hunting with my hounds, whether it is for a big bruin or a small spotted bobcat, I don’t go with intensions of killing every animal my dogs put in a tree for me. I do, however, shoot every animal, with my camera. To me it is the thrill of having the chance to see such a majestic creature with so much power towering above me. I take pictures to remember the experience and respect such a significant animal. Also being out in the wilderness and being able to share such an incredible encounter with the best hunting partners in the world, a hound dog! Hunting with dogs has been around for more than 20,000 years. When people became more advanced and started to domesticate livestock they turned their hunting dogs into herding dogs, and dog hunting became more of a sport then a necessity. Carrying on this amazing way to hunt is something we need to do or else it will become a fading pastime. To me hound hunting is more than just a sport. It is an amazing way to interact with the outdoors and all its astonishing creatures. Learning to harvest the appropriate... read more
A Shot Missed, A Lesson Learned

A Shot Missed, A Lesson Learned

Although some women have been hunting their entire lives, I was a bit of a late bloomer in realizing just how great the sport can be. I often look back and regret the nights I stayed out too late, the mornings I slept in too long and the opportunities I didn’t take while I was growing up back home with my parents. My dad is an avid bow hunter and has been for as long as I can remember. I grew up in a house decorated with mounts of massive elk, beautifully colored waterfowl, bighorn sheep, and most impressively, a number of trophy whitetail bucks. Despite being raised in an environment where most lived and breathed for opening day, I never understood the thrill of it. There wasn’t a single inkling of me that wanted to wake up early, sit in the cold and possibly not reap the benefits of the hard work I had put in. I was 20-years-old when my dad gave me my first bow. The bow itself was nothing special, it was a six-year-old Hoyt hand-me-down but it was all it took to change my mind about this great sport that we all know and love. When my 10-year-old niece Rhian first became interested in hunting, I was eager to share my love of the sport with her. The excitement I got when helping Rhian learn about hunting is unparalleled. Like I said, I had a very late start in the outdoors and as difficult as it is for me to admit, I am jealous of my niece. Rhian had many people in her life... read more