Archery Tips for Rookies :)

Discussion in 'Archery' started by DaniB, May 14, 2015.

  1. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    So, I'd like to call myself a rookie archer. Shucks the day I think I know it all I'm gonna pack my bow away and put it in the back of my closet. The coolest thing about archery is that everyday you can learn something new and challenge yourself to be better than you were the day before. Believe me, by no means do I hit the bullseye every time, and yes I do still suffer from bear fever, buck fever, bull fever, and whatever other kinds of fevers you can get hunting animals. That is what makes it so much more exciting. But now on to my first Archery Tip for Rookies. This isn't a long drawn out tip but it has sure saved me when I'm shooting bow with my sister (she's like a female version of Robin Hood). So when she is calling the shot of where she is going to shoot her arrow at the target before she shoots her bow, and believe me she NEVER misses, below is usually what I do. Saves me from admitting I missed...;)

    Tip #1: To be sure of hitting your target, shoot first. And, whatever you hit, call it the target. :)

    Ladies, If you have any other Archery Tips for Rookies I'd love to hear them! Please feel free to share!
    (In the picture below, that my sister and I. Can you see the target down by the left side of my leg? Ya, you can't always aim for the target everyone expects you to when ya want a cool picture :p)

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderestimate->
    IMG_1914.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2015
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  2. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tip for Rookies
    Welcome to the second Archery Tip for Rookies. This one I got from my brother after asking him what is one of the first pieces of advice he would give to a first time archer. He immediately said...

    Tip #2: Never, absolutely never dry fire a bow.

    Actually never even pull back a bow without an arrow on your bow string. You just never know when something may go haywire. Oh, FYI, a bow works much better when it is not in a million pieces. ;) Have an arrow on, or you bow shouldn't be drawn!

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderestimate->
    IMG_1128.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2015
  3. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tips for Rookies

    Tip #3: Get Help!

    Please! If you do not understand something, get someone with many years of archery experience to help you. Believe me, some older archers may see intimidating, but underneath all that rough and tumble exterior, they would love to show someone just how much they know. Yes, I know people say mistakes are good and you learn from your mistakes. But if you can get someone to help you before your mistake turns into a bad habit that may effect your archery for the long term, then it is best to get knowledgeable assistance!

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderestimate->
     
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  4. Kelsie

    Kelsie Kelsie-Adventurer-BowHunter- Staff Member

    Always flex your arrows after you shoot!
     
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  5. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Thanks Kelsie for that great tip! Always good to remember that!
     
  6. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tips for Rookies!

    Tip #4: When shooting your bow, always follow through with your shot.

    What I mean my this is continue to aim with your bow sight until you see your arrow hit the target. So many times I have taken a shot with my bow and instantly drop it down to see where my arrow hit. This usually results with my arrow hitting lower than I had originally aimed because even before my bow fully made it off my bow string and rest I am already dropping my bow and so it slightly pulls my arrow down. I have to admit that as a first time archer I was always so excited to shoot an animal that I did this more than once. Stinking buck fever. As soon as I would shoot I would drop my bow to see where I hit the buck. Yup, dirt soup. So PLEASE LADIES REMEMBER, aim through your shot!!!!
     
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  7. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tips for Rookies!

    Tip #5: Practice! Please JUST PRACTICE!

    I know you have heard it a million times, but I guarantee you will hear it a million times again! Practicing is the only way to get better and quite frankly I don't care if you shot your bow last week or even yesterday. Today. Today is what I am talking about. I know practice doesn't make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. And the only way to get even remotely perfect and accurate is consistent practice. Have you even missed an animal or made a bad shot? I have. The completely embarrassing gut wrenching feeling as the animal either runs away fine or limps away in pain. Either way that is not acceptable. Today is not yesterday, nor is it tomorrow. Your time to practice is now. I hope you will do so! Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderestimate->

    (Image below, backyard practice at my city home. Ya there is snow but this sure beats the heck out of freezing my fingers off in -30 degrees Celsius a couple weeks before this pic :) IMG_4543.jpg
     
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  8. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tips for Rookies

    Tip #6: Learn to work on and understand how to tune/change/adjust your bow and sights by yourself.

    This tip came from my rookie archer sister. She just began archery/bowhunting last year and in order to have her arrow hit where she wanted it she would adjust how she was aiming and where her anchor hand position was. Ladies please listen, once you have an anchor point sent with your hand DO NOT CHANGE THAT! Keep your anchor point the same. Knowing how to adjust your sights is necessary. Consistency in what you personally do is vital to keep the same in order to shoot consistently. As long as you keep what you do the same you can easily change your sights on your bow to hit exactly where you want your arrow to.

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderestimate->
     
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  9. These are so helpful! I'm new to archery and I'll be doing my first hunt this August. Please keep up all the awesome advice! Thank you :)
     
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  10. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Thanks a lot for the compliment @Whitney Burbidge! Good to know someone's reading these :) I want to personally welcome you to the amazing, wonderful, like so totally rad world of archery! Believe me it is not something you will ever even think you should not have tried! I sure as heck hope you get hooked on archery and get bitten hard by the archery hunting bug/fever (please know that is not a bad thing. Having "Buck Fever" "Bear Fever" "Elk Fever" while doing archery is 100% one of the coolest, craziest, and awesomest feelings you will ever experience! Basically the "archery hunting fever" one gets when they know they have to be so close into that animal's comfort zone, yet they have to be so illusive and insanely quiet and sneaking, and your adrenaline starts to pump and your heart starts drumming to the beat of "we will we will rock you!" Ya like A-M-A-zing!) Any how, I can't wait to hear how your hunt goes and see some pictures! Feel free to post any questions you may have and myself or some other lady archer more highly edumucated than myself will try to help ya out. lol :p If ya don't mind me asking, what are ya going after for your first hunt?

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderstimate->
     
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  11. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tip for Rookies!

    Tip #7: Patience!!!!!

    I cannot overstress this enough. Eventually hearing the word "patience" will sound like someone's beating a dead horse, but please do not just shove it off. Patience is one of the most vital and most fundamental parts of archery. Without patience you don't have accuracy, without accuracy you don't have a good shot, without a good shot you don't have a hit, with out a hit you don't have an animal or even a bullseye. It is like "game over!" I know, when one is target shooting, it is so easy to take your time and walk yourself through all your precise steps to get yourself into your shooting groove. But when you are out hunting, the tables turn more in the animals favour rather than yours. A target doesn't move, it doesn't have a mind of its own, and it sure as heck ain't scared of you! But an animal on the other hand does as it pleases and moves as it wills. When that animal is standing there, I know how easy it is to get caught up in the moment and just want to smoke it as fast as possible. Believe me, I've been there, I still go there, and I will continue to get that adrenaline shot of, "shoot the flipping animal right now!" But taking that few extra seconds and being patient, making sure you have your proper stance, proper anchor point, and can see your sight and know where your arrow will hit and know that the animal is not on too sharp of an angle, will greatly increase your chances of making the best shot on your first shot. Missing an animal, wounding an animal, and losing an animal are often the results of not enough patience on the shot.

    Just remember:
    P - atience
    R - eally
    I - ncreases success for
    M - any
    A - rchers

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUndestimate->
     
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  12. McNay

    McNay Supporting Member

    That awesome moment you finally convince yourself you can change out your rest and get it dialed in without too much of a hitch and it ACTUALLY GOES SMOOTHLY!! woohoo!! AND is 10 tens more accurate then ever!! So that doubly awesome moment when you realize it's the equipment, not the operator!! All arrows hitting the little circle at 30 yards….Talk about walking on clouds :D
    Keep making your posts @DaniB! love em

    oh and for the record I took off the drop away rest and put the whisker biscuit on from my old bow ;)
     
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  13. The first time I picked up a bow and shot it was the absolute most amazing feeling ever! I can't wait to experience the archery hunting fever as you call it. I drew out for a buck and I'm also going to buy a tag for bull elk too. I just can't even wait. I do have a question now. What yardage do you think the top pin should be set at? I'm hunting in Utah and we will be spot and stalking, no tree stands or blinds. Also what b and of gear would you suggest? I love the Prois stuff but it's out of my price range. Thank you! @DaniB
     
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  14. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Hey @Whitney Burbidge that's so freaking exciting! I'm already itching in my seat to see pictures of the monsters you smoke! :) I've hunted archery elk once myself and then have filmed hunting TV shows going after them. It is a feeling like you won't even believe! Like insane! I'm gonna give you a "good luck" and a "GO Get em Girl" already! As far as setting up your sights and choosing a top pin distance, I typically set my top pin for 20 yards, some people choose to set it farther like say 30 yards but I like 20 because you just never know when out of the blue an animal could stand up right in front of you. But I have a couple questions to ask you. How many pins do you have on your sight and what poundage is your bow? Knowing that will I will be able to help ya out a bit better. Shucks I wish I lived closer to ya I'd just swing on over and help ya out! ;) As far as what gear to use, I know your struggle of pricey stuff. It seems like ever day hunting gear jumps in price. Crazy but true. To tell you the truth a lot of what I use is just Cabela's brand camo clothing. I would love to someday have the money to afford Kuiu camo but at the moment that is kinda out of my $$$ range too. Shucks! Also I have always like the camo pattern of Predator Camo. You can use it for almost any setting you find yourself in. I know they don't make a Ladies version but to tell ya the truth I don't think I have ever actually bought "ladies specific" camo clothing. I find it never fits me in the right places. But that I just my own opinion. Prois does make some nice ladies clothing and lots of women seem to really like it I have never tried it myself but I would certinaly like to some day. Kryptek also sells some nice camo clothing. Just depends on what type of apparel you are looking for...Jacket? Long Sleeved Shirt? T-Shirt? Insulated clothing? Rain gear? Lemmeno your thoughts and maybe I can help you out some more. Either way I'm stoked for ya girl! You are gonna love that hunt!!!!!
     
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  15. Thank you @DaniB ! I have a 5 pin sight and I'm at 42 pounds right now but I'm trying to still move up my poundage, just have to get stronger lol. That would be so great! I'd love that. Okay cool, I bought a pair of light pants and a quarter zip long sleeve top from Cabela's and like em. I will be hunting in August but could possibly go into the extended season which goes into November or December. But I would like to just be prepared with a nice warm jacket and some under layers, maybe a pair of warm pants incase. Sometimes winter comes early here in Utah. And maybe something that's waterproof-ish. I was also looking at Kuiu and really like their stuff as well. I don't mind if the clothes are "guys" I can find something that'll work. Thanks for the help again, I greatly appreciate it! Have you ever tried under armor?
     
  16. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Good Day @Whitney Burbidge. Sorry for delay in reply, flipping school keeps me far to busy to keep up with all the fun stuff here on this Prima website. :) I would definitely say with a 5 pin sight at 42 pounds I would sight in your top pin to 20 yards and then you could easily do the other four pins each up by 10 yards. So your sights would be 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60. At least that would be my opinion if I had your sights on my bow. At 42 pounds I would say that you would only want to shoot at an elk farthest at 40-50yards. Best case scenario I'd say drill 'em at 10-20yards, and watch them fall right in their tracks! ;) Hehe. Ok so I have tried Under Armour camo before, but I haven't tried the new camo with Storm Technology. I would have mentioned that before but it is sadly quite pricey, mind you I guess it is all quite pricey, but overall I have heard good reviews of it. If you are watching your budget you can certainly take a look at Scent Blocker. They have some better pricing on some of their women’s apparel. And to be honest with you, I have never in my life actually owned women’s specific camo. I usually find that the small men’s camo fits comfier for long days on hunting. Just my 2 cents. I just recently bought some Browing camo hunting apparel. Not cheap by any stretch of the imagination but to be 100% truthful you cannot put a price on comfort or warmth when you are out in the elements for hours on end. I have the Browning Hell’s Canyon with Primaloft and also their packable rain gear. They have saved me more than once in unexpected crappy conditions and turned an ugly looking hunt into a pretty decent one. I hope this helps you out in some way. Wish I could be of more help. Just send another message if you have any more questions.
     
  17. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Hey @McNay! That is so flipping awesome to hear! You go girl!

    It's crazy to think but your equipment is only as smart as you are. If you think you have a snazzy piece of equipment but don't know how to use it or work it then truly it don't matter how much technology it should have in it all of that will be useless to you!

    So glad that you got that bow all figured out and working well for you! Got any pictures of your target practice that I can see just to make sure you got them arrows hitting the little circles like you say! ;) Not that I don't believe you I just really wanna see what that big ol' boar is gonna be up against! Make sure he has not chance of survival! :p
     
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  18. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tips for Rookies

    Tip #8: Finding Your Draw Length

    As an archer it is very beneficial to know the measurement of your own draw length and how to find it. The most popular method for finding your draw length is called the wingspan method. This method can find your draw length in three easy steps

    1) Hold your arms out and away from your body forming the letter T.
    2) Using a tape measure, measure across your arms from the tip of your longest finger on your right hand to the tip of your longest finger on your left hand (or vice versa if you want to go left side to right side lol :). You just might need someone else to help you measure this part. It is kind of tough to do it on your own.
    3) Finally take your maximum measurement from your finger tips and divide it by 2.5. This will give you the closest you will get to your exact draw length measurement.

    Example:
    My wingspan = 65”
    Calculation = 65 / 2.5
    Draw Length: 26”

    Shoot Straight & }}-NeverUnderestimate->

    draw length.jpeg
     
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  19. DaniB

    DaniB Staff Member

    Archery Tip for Rookies

    Tip #9: Draw Weight
    (from yeoldarcheryshoppe.com)

    Draw Weight is the peak amount of weight an archer will pull while drawing the bow. With a traditional bow, the draw weight continues to increase as the bow is drawn. A compound bow will increase to the peak weight, and then drop in weight to the holding weight. The holding weight is typically 20-30% of the peak weight. So a 60# compound bow will only hit 60# for period in the draw cycle, and then will drop down to perhaps a 15# holding weight at anchor. This allows the archer to hold on target much longer than a traditional bow, whose archer would be holding the full 60#s. High performance bows will stay at this peak weight longer during the draw cycle thus storing more energy but typically creating a harsher draw cycle.

    Compound bows are adjustable over a 10 to 15 # range. The weight listed is with the limbs bottomed out, or at the maximum peak weight. So a bow listed at 70#'s is adjustable from 60-70#, and sometimes 55-70#.

    A new archer will be able to pull about 10 pounds more weight with a few weeks of regular practice as previously little used muscles gain strength.

    Use this chart to see typical draw weights:

    Small child weighing 50-70 lbs - Draw weight: 10-15 lbs
    Child weighing 70-100 lbs - Draw weight: 15-25 lbs
    Most women, boys weighing from 100 - 130 lbs - Draw weight: 30-40 lbs
    Women above average strength; youth boys weighing 130 - 150 lbs - Draw weight: 40-50 lbs
    Most men weighing 150-180 lbs - Draw Weight: Target 40-55 lbs
    Most men weighing 150-180 lbs Bowhunting or 3D - Draw Weight: 50-65 lbs
    Muscular young men and larger men weighing 180 lbs and up - Draw weight: 60-70 lbs
     
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  20. McNay

    McNay Supporting Member

    Challenge accepted! Pics coming later @DaniB o_O
     

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